Richard L. Lougee


There’s nothing like standing next to a client when he’s facing life in prison and hearing the verdict “not guilty on all counts.”

In 1969, I was drafted into the army before I even had a chance to complete my education. I believe it’s safe to say that this early experience had a significant impact on my decision to later pursue a career where I could be a full-time advocate for those in need.

As Featured inNew Yorker logo
light-blue-quote.png
My work in the El Grande case was covered by a variety of news sources, including The New Yorker.
Richard Lougee

In 1997, three people were shot and killed in a South Side market known as “El Grande.” My client was charged with murder, but I was able to get him acquitted by the jury in a total of 42 minutes. Still, that isn’t even the full story. The real issue was that the prosecutor committed misconduct. After I filed a complaint with the bar association, the police investigated the matter, and he was later disbarred. For further information, I encourage you to read the full New Yorker article written by Jeffrey Toobin.

Regardless of what has happened, you still have rights.

Fight For Them.

Child Pornography prosecutions are on the rise


Harsh Punishments

The penalty for child pornography charges is draconian no matter how minor the offense, but I work to obtain a rational sentence.

Ruined Reputations

A conviction can cause you to lose your home, your job, and even your friends and family. I will fight to protect your name.

A Need for Justice

Varying levels of offenses should receive varying levels of punishment, and that’s exactly what I strive to enforce.

What my clients say

white-bg-quote.png

Historic Cases

"It is better 100 guilty persons should escape than that one innocent person should suffer." - Benjamin Franklin

Throughout my history of practice, I have continually challenged the criminal justice system to evolve and improve. Early on in my career, I remember working with a client who was wrongly accused of molesting his daughter. Other attorneys, including the prosecutor, claimed the research showed that children simply don’t lie about those types of incidents. 

However, I’m not one to accept anything at face value, especially from the opposing counsel. Because I had my doubts, I decided to dig deeper in my own investigation.

Ultimately, I decided to team up with a psychologist and a medical doctor to do my own research. The three of us put together a criminal defense team to examine a variety of statements made by children, and although you could not technically prove that any of them were lying, it was obvious that not all claims fit within a probable context. 

To this day, I still consult with psychologists on many of my cases. I believe a team approach works best, and I’ll do whatever it takes to protect someone whom I know has been wrongly accused.